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Gambling, Resource Distribution, and Racial Economy: An Examination of Poker Machine Expenditure in Three Remote Australian Towns

Young, Martin, Lamb, David and Doran, Bruce (2011). Gambling, Resource Distribution, and Racial Economy: An Examination of Poker Machine Expenditure in Three Remote Australian Towns. Geographical Research,49(1):59-71.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 83093774xPUB145
Title Gambling, Resource Distribution, and Racial Economy: An Examination of Poker Machine Expenditure in Three Remote Australian Towns
Author Young, Martin
Lamb, David
Doran, Bruce
Journal Name Geographical Research
Publication Date 2011
Volume Number 49
Issue Number 1
ISSN 1745-5863   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-79551489034
Start Page 59
End Page 71
Total Pages 13
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Our aim in this paper is to examine the ways in which electronic gaming machines (EGMs) redistribute resources to and from three remote towns in the Northern Territory (NT), namely Katherine, Tennant Creek and Nhulunbuy. We describe EGM expenditure levels in each town at the level of the individual venue, examine patterns of socioeconomic status within each town, explore the ways in which EGM markets are racialised through venue gate-keeping practices and spatially-based alcohol regulations, and examine the effects of resource redistribution mechanisms designed to return a proportion of EGM profits to host communities. The ability of venues to draw resources from extremely disadvantaged groups from the remote periphery is of central concern when attempting to assess the societal consequences of gambling in remote towns, both in terms of individual harm and the adequacy of resource redistribution. Existing mechanisms for resource redistribution are both selective and relatively meagre, pointing to a political and racial economy of EGM gambling that transfers resources from remote towns to sites of centralised 'white' power. We conclude that political economy in the context of remote NT towns may not be understood outside a consideration of racial economy and the way that constructed notions of race operate to legitimate existing processes of economic exploitation and resource redistribution. 
Keywords Electronic gaming machines
Gambling
Northern Territory
Racial economy
Remote towns
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-5871.2010.00667.x   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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