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Predation by the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) on sea turtle adults, eggs, and hatchlings

Whiting, Scott D. and Whiting, Andrea U. (2011). Predation by the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) on sea turtle adults, eggs, and hatchlings. Chelonian Conservation and Biology: international journal of turtle and tortoise research,10(2):198-205.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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IRMA ID 83093774xPUB154
Title Predation by the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) on sea turtle adults, eggs, and hatchlings
Author Whiting, Scott D.
Whiting, Andrea U.
Journal Name Chelonian Conservation and Biology: international journal of turtle and tortoise research
Publication Date 2011
Volume Number 10
Issue Number 2
ISSN 1071-8443   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84855434352
Start Page 198
End Page 205
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication United States
Publisher Chelonian Research Foundation
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract This paper describes predation tactics used by the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) on flatback (Natator depressus) and olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) sea turtles on nesting beaches in northern Australia. For adult turtles, crocodiles used both a sit-and-wait tactic in which they attacked a turtle at the water's edge after it completed nesting and an active hunting strategy in which crocodiles followed turtle tracks into the dunes to attack turtles at nest sites. Saltwater crocodiles also hunted sea turtle hatchlings in the dunes and excavated a sea turtle nest and consumed the eggs. The protection of saltwater crocodiles in Australia starting in the early 1970s has led to increased population sizes and a greater proportion of larger individuals. This likely has resulted in increased predation rates on sea turtles over several decades, which should be considered as an important mortality component for some tropical nesting aggregations.
Keywords Reptilia
Testudines
Cheloniidae
foraging
mortality
behaviour
olive ridley turtle
flatback turtle
predator
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2744/CCB-0881.1   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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