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Reinforcing alternative economies: Self-motivated work by central Anmatyerr people to sell Katyerr (Desert raisin, Bush tomato) in central Australia

Holcombe, Sarah, Yates, Peter and Walsh, Fiona (2011). Reinforcing alternative economies: Self-motivated work by central Anmatyerr people to sell Katyerr (Desert raisin, Bush tomato) in central Australia. The Rangeland Journal,33(3):255-265.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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ISI LOC 000294668600004
IRMA ID 83093774xPUB174
Title Reinforcing alternative economies: Self-motivated work by central Anmatyerr people to sell Katyerr (Desert raisin, Bush tomato) in central Australia
Author Holcombe, Sarah
Yates, Peter
Walsh, Fiona
Journal Name The Rangeland Journal
Publication Date 2011
Volume Number 33
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1036-9872   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-80052692167
Start Page 255
End Page 265
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
HERDC Category C2 - Journal Article - Other contributions to refereed journal (internal)
Abstract This paper examines an alternative economy in the Anmatyerr region of central Australia, with reference to the ‘hybrid economy’ concept. We argue that this concept has application in recognising emerging Aboriginal economies surrounding the utilisation and management of natural resources. In particular, we examine the ‘bush harvest’ of one species – where Aboriginal people sell Desert raisin (Katyerr or Bush tomato) to traders who then on-sell to manufacturers and retailers. This seasonal economy intermittently injects relatively significant amounts of cash into households (but unaccounted for in census figures). Although some groups have been selling bush harvest produce for up to 30 years, it is increasingly gaining momentum with a larger market developing. Yet, there is a risk that this burgeoning market and the mainstream interest in horticulture will fail to recognise the value of local Aboriginal motivations that drive the customary harvest activity. Nevertheless, there is increased federal government recognition, via the Central Land Council, of the value of Aboriginal people as local land managers; as rangers. This in turn has provided resources to promote and encourage this harvest through the recognition of Aboriginal land management practices, such as seasonal burning to encourage the crop’s growth.
Keywords Aboriginal people
arid zone
bush foods
bush harvest
local knowledge
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/RJ10081   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 17 Jan 2014, 00:55:00 CST