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Using computer-based instruction to improve Indigenous early literacy in Northern Australia: A quasi-experimental study

Wolgemuth, Jennifer R., Savage, Robert, Helmer, Janet, Lea, Tess, Harper, Helen A., Chalkiti, Kalotina, Bottrell, Christine E. and Abrami, Philip (2011). Using computer-based instruction to improve Indigenous early literacy in Northern Australia: A quasi-experimental study. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology,27(4):727-750.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID lloobyxPUB39
Title Using computer-based instruction to improve Indigenous early literacy in Northern Australia: A quasi-experimental study
Author Wolgemuth, Jennifer R.
Savage, Robert
Helmer, Janet
Lea, Tess
Harper, Helen A.
Chalkiti, Kalotina
Bottrell, Christine E.
Abrami, Philip
Journal Name Australasian Journal of Educational Technology
Publication Date 2011
Volume Number 27
Issue Number 4
ISSN 1449-5554   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-80053067810
Start Page 727
End Page 750
Total Pages 24
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher A S C I L I T E
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract The effectiveness of a web-based reading support tool, ABRACADABRA, to improve the literacy outcomes of Indigenous and non-Indigenous students was evaluated over one semester in several Northern Territory primary schools in 2009. ABRACADABRA is intended as a support for teachers in the early years of schooling, giving them a friendly, game and evidence-based tool to reinforce their literacy instruction. The classroom implementation of ABRACADABRA by briefly trained and intensively supported teachers was evaluated using a quasi-experimental pretest, post-test control group design with 118 children in the intervention and 48 in the control. Children received either a minimum of 20 hours of technology-based intervention or regular classroom teaching. Results revealed both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students who received ABRACADABRA instruction had significantly higher phonological awareness scores than their control group peers. The effect size for this difference was large (eta squared=.14). This finding remained when controlling for student attendance and the quality of general non-technology-based literacy instruction. Limitations of the study and implications for effective practice in remote and regional contexts are discussed.
Description for Link Link to published version
URL http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet27/wolgemuth.html


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