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Evaluation of a culturally adapted training in Indigenous Mental Health and Wellbeing for the Alcohol and Other Drug Workforce

Hinton, Rachael and Nagel, Tricia M. (2012). Evaluation of a culturally adapted training in Indigenous Mental Health and Wellbeing for the Alcohol and Other Drug Workforce. ISRN Public Health,2012(Article ID 380581):1-6.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID cspargoxPUB15
Title Evaluation of a culturally adapted training in Indigenous Mental Health and Wellbeing for the Alcohol and Other Drug Workforce
Author Hinton, Rachael
Nagel, Tricia M.
Journal Name ISRN Public Health
Publication Date 2012
Volume Number 2012
Issue Number Article ID 380581
ISSN 2090-8008   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1
End Page 6
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication United States
Publisher International Scholarly Research Network (ISRN)
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Indigenous Australians have high rates of mental illness comorbid with substance misuse. The complex needs of this client group create challenges for the alcohol and other drug (AOD) workforce. This paper describes the outcomes of an Indigenous-specific “Yarning about Mental Health” training for the AOD workforce to strengthen knowledge and skills in mental health approaches and in their engagement with Indigenous clients. The training provides culturally adapted strategies and tools for understanding mental health, promoting wellbeing, and delivering brief interventions in the substance misuse setting. A nonexperimental evaluation which incorporated pre-post questionnaires was conducted with workshop participants attending one of four trainings. The training was perceived to be highly appropriate and helpful in participants’ work with Indigenous AOD clients. There was significant improvement in confidence and knowledge related to Indigenous mental health and wellbeing and qualitative data supported these positive outcomes. This study supports the need to blend Indigenous concepts of health and wellbeing with non-Indigenous ways of understanding and treating illness in order to develop services which are appropriate to Indigenous peoples. It also suggests research is required to understand whether self-reported increases in knowledge and confidence can translate into behavioural changes in participants' teaching and practice of culturally competent care and to improved client outcomes.

DOI http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.5402/2012/380581   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/


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