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The DRUID study: racism and self-assessed health status in an indigenous population.

Paradies, Yin C. and Cunningham, Joan (2012). The DRUID study: racism and self-assessed health status in an indigenous population.. BMC Public Health,12(131):1-12.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title The DRUID study: racism and self-assessed health status in an indigenous population.
Author Paradies, Yin C.
Cunningham, Joan
Journal Name BMC Public Health
Publication Date 2012
Volume Number 12
Issue Number 131
ISSN 1471-2458   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84857004134
Start Page 1
End Page 12
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Background
There is now considerable evidence from around the world that racism is associated with both mental and physical ill-health. However, little is known about the mediating factors between racism and ill-health. This paper investigates relationships between racism and self-assessed mental and physical health among Indigenous Australians as well as potential mediators of these relationships.

Methods
A total of 164 adults in the Darwin Region Urban Indigenous Diabetes (DRUID) study completed a validated instrument assessing interpersonal racism and a separate item on discrimination-related stress. Self-assessed health status was measured using the SF-12. Stress, optimism, lack of control, social connections, cultural identity and reactions/responses to interpersonal racism were considered as mediators and moderators of the relationship between racism/discrimination and self-assessed health status.

Results
After adjusting for socio-demographic factors, interpersonal racism was significantly associated with the SF-12 mental (but not the physical) health component. Stress, lack of control and feeling powerless as a reaction to racism emerged as significant mediators of the relationship between racism and general mental health. Similar findings emerged for discrimination-related stress.

Conclusions
Racism/discrimination is significantly associated with poor general mental health among this indigenous population. The mediating factors between racism and mental health identified in this study suggest new approaches to ameliorating the detrimental effects of racism on health. In particular, the importance of reducing racism-related stress, enhancing general levels of mastery, and minimising negative social connections in order to ameliorate the negative consequences of racism.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-12-131   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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