Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Pulmonary manifestations of uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria: cough, small airways obstruction, impaired gas transfer, and increased pulmonary phagocytic activity

Anstey, Nicholas M., Jacups, Susan P., Cain, T., Pearson, T., Ziesing, P. J., Fisher, Dale A., Currie, Bart J., Marks, P. J. and Maguire, Graeme P. (2002). Pulmonary manifestations of uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria: cough, small airways obstruction, impaired gas transfer, and increased pulmonary phagocytic activity. The Journal of Infectious Diseases,185(9):1326-1334.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

Title Pulmonary manifestations of uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria: cough, small airways obstruction, impaired gas transfer, and increased pulmonary phagocytic activity
Author Anstey, Nicholas M.
Jacups, Susan P.
Cain, T.
Pearson, T.
Ziesing, P. J.
Fisher, Dale A.
Currie, Bart J.
Marks, P. J.
Maguire, Graeme P.
Journal Name The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Publication Date 2002
Volume Number 185
Issue Number 9
ISSN 1528-8366   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1326
End Page 1334
Total Pages 9
Place of Publication Chicago, IL, USA
Publisher Internet Scientific Publications, Llc.
Language English
Field of Research 320000 Medical and Health Sciences
Abstract Despite recognition of acute respiratory distress syndrome in both falciparum and vivax malaria, disease-related changes in pulmonary function have not been defined, and underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function, pulmonary phagocytic cell activity, and longitudinal changes were examined in 26 adults with uncomplicated falciparum, vivax, and ovale malaria after treatment. Self-limiting cough occurred in both falciparum (36%) and vivax or ovale (53%) malaria. In infection with each malaria species, admission measures of airflow and gas transfer were lower than predicted, and mean lung 99mtechnetium-sulfur-colloid uptake was significantly increased. Changes were most evident in falciparum malaria, with treatment resulting in initial worsening of airflow obstruction and gas transfer. Altered pulmonary function in malaria is common and includes airflow obstruction, impaired ventilation, impaired gas transfer, and increased pulmonary phagocytic activity, and its occurrence in both vivax and falciparum malaria suggests that there may be common underlying inflammatory mechanisms.
Keywords cough
falciparum
phagocytic
Pulmonary manifestations
vivax malaria
Additional Notes 3585 (Journal)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 38 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 17 Dec 2007, 09:02:11 CST