Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

The breeding biology of the Mangrove Gerygone, Gerygone laevigaster, in the Darwin region, with notes on brood parasitism by the Little Bronze-cuckoo, Chrysococcyx minutillus

Noske, RA (2001). The breeding biology of the Mangrove Gerygone, Gerygone laevigaster, in the Darwin region, with notes on brood parasitism by the Little Bronze-cuckoo, Chrysococcyx minutillus. Emu,101(2):129-135.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts:
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

Title The breeding biology of the Mangrove Gerygone, Gerygone laevigaster, in the Darwin region, with notes on brood parasitism by the Little Bronze-cuckoo, Chrysococcyx minutillus
Author Noske, RA
Journal Name Emu
Publication Date 2001
Volume Number 101
Issue Number 2
ISSN 0158-4197   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 129
End Page 135
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Collingwood, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Gerygones comprise 19 species of small (mostly 6-7 g) foliage-gleaning insectivores distributed from south-east Asia to New Zealand. I collected breeding data on the Mangrove Gerygone, Gerygone laevigaster, from several populations in and around Darwin, Northern Territory. The egg-laying season extended from March to October, coinciding with the late wet season and entire dry season, with peaks in April and October (n = 45). All populations showed repeat nesting after failure; one colour-banded pair made four attempts over one season. The species is apparently multi-brooded, one pair attempting a late brood after two previous successful broods. Most complete clutches (74%) were of two eggs, and the remainder, three. Most nests (84%) were built in Grey Mangroves, Avicennia marina, on the edge of saltflats, and 91% were in the top half of the nest plant. Incubation and nestling periods were 16-17 and 14-17 days, respectively. Of 31 nests whose fate was known, only three (10%) produced fledglings. Five broods (16%) were parasitised by Little Bronze-Cuckoos, Chrysococcyx minutillus; the incubation period for one cuckoo egg was about 15 days, while two nestling periods were estimated to be 18 and 24 days. Several nests were inundated by high spring tides, but predation was probably the major cause of nest failure: seven (23%) nests exhibited holes, six (19%) were destroyed, while eight (26%) showed no damage. The long, mainly dry-season, breeding of this species may be an adaption to greater insect availability at this time of the year, or avoidance of wet-season predators (such as reptiles), or both.
Keywords birds
morphology
australia
evolution
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071MU00013   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 54 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 Sep 2008, 08:35:25 CST by Administrator