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Mandarin comes to Darwin: How a Language Adapts to an Australian Situation

Black, Paul and Chen, Zongmin (2013). Mandarin comes to Darwin: How a Language Adapts to an Australian Situation. In: Applied Linguistics Association of Australia National Conference 2012: Evolving Paradigms: Language and Applied Linguistics in a Changing World, Perth, WA, 12-14 November 2012.

Document type: Conference Paper
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IRMA ID 84279116xPUB10
Author Black, Paul
Chen, Zongmin
Title Mandarin comes to Darwin: How a Language Adapts to an Australian Situation
Conference Name Applied Linguistics Association of Australia National Conference 2012: Evolving Paradigms: Language and Applied Linguistics in a Changing World
Conference Location Perth, WA
Conference Dates 12-14 November 2012
Conference Publication Title Refereed Proceedings: Applied Linguistics Association Annual Conference 2012
Place of Publication Perth, WA
Publisher School of Education, Curtin University
Publication Year 2013
ISBN 978-0-9874158-2-0   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 525
End Page 547
Total Pages 23
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DIISR)
Abstract This is a pilot study of how Mandarin speakers adjust their speech to suit the new environment they find upon coming to live in Australia, or more specifically Darwin. It is based largely on seven hours of recorded dinnertime conversation among
Mandarin speakers who have lived in Australia for less than four years. As one might expect, these speakers tend to resort to English for referring to Australian places and institutions, sometimes for concepts one might expect to be expressed in Chinese, such as 'fence'. Anecdotal and interview data brings out such other aspects as Southeast Asian influences on the Mandarin spoken in Darwin, while an analysis of a bilingual Chinese- English publication from the Perth area shows how
Australian concepts are rendered into Chinese in print.
Keyword Adaptation
Australia
Borrowing
Chinese
Mandarine
Description for Link Link to conference homepage
Link to published version
URL http://www.promaco.com.au/events/ALAA2012/
http://humanities.curtin.edu.au/schools/EDU/education/alaa-proceedings.cfm


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