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Same, same but different: symbiotic bacterial associations in GBR sponges

Webster, Nicole S., Luter, Heidi M., Soo, R. M., Botte, E. S., Simister, R. L., Abdo, D. and Whalan, Steve (2013). Same, same but different: symbiotic bacterial associations in GBR sponges. Frontiers in Microbiology,3(444):1-11.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 82057923xPUB361
Title Same, same but different: symbiotic bacterial associations in GBR sponges
Author Webster, Nicole S.
Luter, Heidi M.
Soo, R. M.
Botte, E. S.
Simister, R. L.
Abdo, D.
Whalan, Steve
Journal Name Frontiers in Microbiology
Publication Date 2013
Volume Number 3
Issue Number 444
ISSN 1664-302X   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84876503896
Start Page 1
End Page 11
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication Switzerland
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Symbioses in marine sponges involve diverse consortia of microorganisms that contribute to the health and ecology of their hosts. The microbial communities of 13 taxonomically diverse Great Barrier Reef (GBR) sponge species were assessed by DGGE and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to determine intra and inter species variation in bacterial symbiont composition. Microbial profiling revealed communities that were largely conserved within different individuals of each species with intra species similarity ranging from 65–100%. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Nitrospira, and Cyanobacteria. Sponge-associated microbes were also highly host-specific with no operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all species and the most ubiquitous OTU found in only 5 of the 13 sponge species. In total, 91% of the OTUs were restricted to a single sponge species. However, GBR sponge microbes were more closely related to other sponge-derived bacteria than they were to environmental communities with sequences falling within 50 of the 173 previously defined sponge-(or sponge-coral) specific sequence clusters (SC). These SC spanned the Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospira, and the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae superphylum. The number of sequences assigned to these sponge-specific clusters across all species ranged from 0 to 92%. No relationship between host phylogeny and symbiont communities were observed across the different sponge orders, although the highest level of similarity was detected in two closely related Xestospongia species. This study identifies the core microbial inhabitants in a range of GBR sponges thereby providing the basis for future studies on sponge symbiotic function and research aiming to predict how sponge holobionts will respond to environmental perturbation.
Keywords Sponge
Microorganism
Symbiont
Diversity
Great Barrier Reef
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2012.00444   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to CC Attribution 3.0 License
URL https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/legalcode


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