Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Erosion of river terraces as a component of large catchment sediment budgets: A pilot study from the Gangetic Plain

Wasson, Robert J., Chauhan, Mohan S., Sharma, Chhaya, Jaiswal, Manoj, Singhvi, Ashok K. and Srivastava, Pradeep (2013). Erosion of river terraces as a component of large catchment sediment budgets: A pilot study from the Gangetic Plain. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences,67-68:18-25.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 82057923xPUB454
Title Erosion of river terraces as a component of large catchment sediment budgets: A pilot study from the Gangetic Plain
Author Wasson, Robert J.
Chauhan, Mohan S.
Sharma, Chhaya
Jaiswal, Manoj
Singhvi, Ashok K.
Srivastava, Pradeep
Journal Name Journal of Asian Earth Sciences
Publication Date 2013
Volume Number 67-68
ISSN 1367-9120   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84875939033
Start Page 18
End Page 25
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Elsevier Science
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Erosion of river terraces and alluvial interfluves in large catchments may be a significant source of sediment, but is not readily included in sediment budgets because quantification is not straightforward. Here a pond on a large river terrace on the Gangetic Plain in northern India provides: an estimate of the proportion of sheet and rill erosion products that reaches a valley floor and, by analogy, the amount that reaches a channel that drains to a major river; and insights into the sensitivity of this delivery to climate change and land use. Comparison is made between the rate of delivery of the products of sheet and rill erosion to a valley floor with approximate sediment yield from gullies indicating that the latter is likely to be a more significant source of sediment. This is a pilot study and its limitations can guide future research. The construction of sediment budgets in many large catchments worldwide could potentially include the approach reported here. The study also contributes to understanding of human–environment interactions, specifically with regard to sheet erosion of agricultural soils.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jseaes.2013.02.003   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 20 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 07 Aug 2014, 17:00:35 CST