Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Agonistic Behaviour in Juvenile Crocodilians

Brien, Matthew L., Lang, Jeffrey W., Webb, Grahame J., Stevenson, Colin and Christian, Keith A. (2013). The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Agonistic Behaviour in Juvenile Crocodilians. PLoS One,8(12):e80872-1-e80872-12.

Document type: Journal Article
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your CDU eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Download this reading Brien_40419.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.05MB 85
Reading the attached file works best in Firefox, Chrome and IE 9 or later.

IRMA ID 82057923xPUB574
Title The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Agonistic Behaviour in Juvenile Crocodilians
Author Brien, Matthew L.
Lang, Jeffrey W.
Webb, Grahame J.
Stevenson, Colin
Christian, Keith A.
Journal Name PLoS One
Publication Date 2013
Volume Number 8
Issue Number 12
ISSN 1932-6203   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84892582413
Start Page e80872-1
End Page e80872-12
Total Pages 12
Place of Publication United States of America
Publisher Public Library of Science
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract We examined agonistic behaviour in seven species of hatchling and juvenile crocodilians held in small groups (N = 4) under similar laboratory conditions. Agonistic interactions occurred in all seven species, typically involved two individuals, were short in duration (5–15 seconds), and occurred between 1600–2200 h in open water. The nature and extent of agonistic interactions, the behaviours displayed, and the level of conspecific tolerance varied among species. Discrete postures, non-contact and contact movements are described. Three of these were species-specific: push downs by C. johnstoni; inflated tail sweeping by C. novaeguineae; and, side head striking combined with tail wagging by C. porosus. The two long-snouted species (C. johnstoni and G. gangeticus) avoided contact involving the head and often raised the head up out of the way during agonistic interactions. Several behaviours not associated with aggression are also described, including snout rubbing, raising the head up high while at rest, and the use of vocalizations. The two most aggressive species (C. porosus, C. novaeguineae) appeared to form dominance hierarchies, whereas the less aggressive species did not. Interspecific differences in agonistic behaviour may reflect evolutionary divergence associated with morphology, ecology, general life history and responses to interspecific conflict in areas where multiple species have co-existed. Understanding species-specific traits in agonistic behaviour and social tolerance has implications for the controlled raising of different species of hatchlings for conservation, management or production purposes.

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0080872   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Open access True
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to CC Attribution 4.0 License
URL https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/au/legalcode


© copyright

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in CDU eSpace. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact digitisation@cdu.edu.au.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 77 Abstract Views, 85 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 07 Aug 2014, 17:05:24 CST