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From little things, big things grow; trends and fads in 110 years of Australian ornithology

Yarwood, Maree R., Weston, Michael A. and Garnett, Stephen T. (2014). From little things, big things grow; trends and fads in 110 years of Australian ornithology. Scientometrics: an international journal for all quantitative aspects of the science of science communication in science and science policy,98(3):2235-2254.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 82057923xPUB602
Title From little things, big things grow; trends and fads in 110 years of Australian ornithology
Author Yarwood, Maree R.
Weston, Michael A.
Garnett, Stephen T.
Journal Name Scientometrics: an international journal for all quantitative aspects of the science of science communication in science and science policy
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 98
Issue Number 3
ISSN 0138-9130   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84889971205
Start Page 2235
End Page 2254
Total Pages 20
Place of Publication Hungary
Publisher Akademiai Kiado Rt.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Publishing histories can reveal changes in ornithological effort, focus or direction through time. This study presents a bibliometric content analysis of Emu (1901-2011) which revealed 115 trends (long-term changes in publication over time) and 18 fads (temporary increases in publication activity) from the classification of 9,039 articles using 128 codes organised into eight categories (author gender, author affiliation, article type, subject, main focus, main method, geographical scale and geographical location). Across 110 years, private authorship declined, while publications involving universities and multiple institutions increased; from 1960, female authorship increased. Over time, question-driven studies and incidental observations increased and decreased in frequency, respectively. Single species and 'taxonomic group' subjects increased while studies of birds at specific places decreased. The focus of articles shifted from species distribution and activities of the host organisation to breeding, foraging and other biological/ecological topics. Site- and Australian-continental-scales slightly decreased over time; non-Australian studies increased from the 1970s. A wide variety of fads occurred (e.g. articles on bird distribution, 1942-1951, and using museum specimens, 1906-1913) though the occurrence of fads decreased over time. Changes over time are correlated with technological, theoretical, social and institutional changes, and suggest ornithological priorities, like those of other scientific disciplines, are temporally labile.
Keywords Avian ecology
Avian science
Bibliometric
Bird study
Birds
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11192-013-1144-z   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Thu, 07 Aug 2014, 17:06:10 CST