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Productivity is negatively related to shoot growth across five mango cultivars in the seasonally wet-dry tropics of northern Australia

Lu, Ping, Chacko, Elias K., Bithell, Sean L., Schaper, Heinz, Wiebel, Josef, Cole, Steve and Muller, Warren J. (2013). Productivity is negatively related to shoot growth across five mango cultivars in the seasonally wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. Fruits: fruit and horticultural productions in tropical and Mediterranean regions,68(4):279-289.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 82057923xPUB608
Title Productivity is negatively related to shoot growth across five mango cultivars in the seasonally wet-dry tropics of northern Australia
Author Lu, Ping
Chacko, Elias K.
Bithell, Sean L.
Schaper, Heinz
Wiebel, Josef
Cole, Steve
Muller, Warren J.
Journal Name Fruits: fruit and horticultural productions in tropical and Mediterranean regions
Publication Date 2013
Volume Number 68
Issue Number 4
ISSN 0248-1294   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84883537146
Start Page 279
End Page 289
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication France
Publisher E D P Sciences
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Introduction. Mango productivity is low in seasonally wet-dry tropical areas where breeding programs require information on factors affecting productivity of mango cultivars. Specifically, our study tested a novel hypothesis that, among Australian- and Florida-bred cultivars, the greater growth of vegetatively vigorous cultivars would contribute to lower levels of fruit production in comparison with less vegetatively vigorous cultivars, in a wet-dry tropical environment. Materials and methods. A field experiment was conducted on trees of the cultivars ‘Kensington Pride’ and ‘Strawberry’, both polyembryonic cultivars, and ‘Haden’, ‘Irwin’ and ‘Tommy Atkins’, all monoembryonic cultivars. Results. Shoot growth was recorded over two years; in both years the polyembryonic cultivars produced more new shoot length than the monoembryonic cultivars; ‘Irwin’ was the least vigorous cultivar in both years. Across cultivars, there was a negative relationship between normalised (by flowering intensity and canopy area) fruit number or yield and vegetative vigour as represented by new shoot length. Conclusion. The results supported the hypothesis that the greater shoot growth of vegetatively vigorous cultivars contributed to lower levels of fruit production in comparison with less vegetatively vigorous cultivars in a tropical environment. This is the first study which demonstrates that the extent of seasonal shoot growth had a fruit production cost for mango.
Keywords Australia
Mangifera indica
Yields
Vigour
Variety trials
Polyembroyony
Monoembryony
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/fruits/2013074   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Open access True
Additional Notes Copyright by E D P Sciences


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