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The development of chronic cough in children following presentation to a tertiary paediatric emergency department with acute respiratory illness: study protocol for a prospective cohort study

Drescher, Benjamin, Chang, Anne B., Phillips, Natalie, Acworth, Jason, Marchant, Julie, Sloots, Theo P., David, Michael and O'Grady, Kerry-Ann F. (2013). The development of chronic cough in children following presentation to a tertiary paediatric emergency department with acute respiratory illness: study protocol for a prospective cohort study. BMC Pediatrics,13:125-1-125-9.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID cmartelxPUB113
NHMRC Grant No. 1045157
545216
Title The development of chronic cough in children following presentation to a tertiary paediatric emergency department with acute respiratory illness: study protocol for a prospective cohort study
Author Drescher, Benjamin
Chang, Anne B.
Phillips, Natalie
Acworth, Jason
Marchant, Julie
Sloots, Theo P.
David, Michael
O'Grady, Kerry-Ann F.
Journal Name BMC Pediatrics
Publication Date 2013
Volume Number 13
ISSN 1471-2431   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 125-1
End Page 125-9
Total Pages 9
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
HERDC Category C2 - Journal Article - Other contributions to refereed journal (internal)
Abstract Background
Acute respiratory illness, a leading cause of cough in children, accounts for a substantial proportion of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. In some children acute cough progresses to chronic cough (>4 weeks duration), impacting on morbidity and decreasing quality of life. Despite the importance of chronic cough as a cause of substantial childhood morbidity and associated economic, family and social costs, data on the prevalence, predictors, aetiology and natural history of the symptom are scarce. This study aims to comprehensively describe the epidemiology, aetiology and outcomes of cough during and after acute respiratory illness in children presenting to a tertiary paediatric emergency department.

Methods/design
A prospective cohort study of children aged <15 years attending the Royal Children’s Hospital Emergency Department, Brisbane, for a respiratory illness that includes parent reported cough (wet or dry) as a symptom. The primary objective is to determine the prevalence and predictors of chronic cough (≥4 weeks duration) post presentation with acute respiratory illness. Demographic, epidemiological, risk factor, microbiological and clinical data are completed at enrolment. Subjects complete daily cough dairies and weekly follow-up contacts for 28(±3) days to ascertain cough persistence. Children who continue to cough for 28 days post enrolment are referred to a paediatric respiratory physician for review. Primary analysis will be the proportion of children with persistent cough at day 28(±3). Multivariate analyses will be performed to evaluate variables independently associated with chronic cough at day 28(±3).

Discussion
Our protocol will be the first to comprehensively describe the natural history, epidemiology, aetiology and outcomes of cough during and after acute respiratory illness in children. The results will contribute to studies leading to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines to improve the early detection and management of chronic cough in children during and after acute respiratory illness.
Keywords Acute respiratory illness
Chronic lung disease
Chronic cough
Paediatric emergency department
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to CC Attribution 3.0 License
Link to published version
URL https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/legalcode
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2431/13/125/abstract


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