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STI in remote communities: improved and enhanced primary health care (STRIVE) study protocol: a cluster randomised controlled trial comparing 'usual practice' STI care to enhanced care in remote primary health care services in Australia

Ward, James, McGregor, Skye, Guy, Rebecca, Rumbold, Alice R., Garton, Linda, Silver, Bronwyn J., Taylor-Thomson, Debbie M., Hengel, Belinda, Knox, Janet, Dyda, Amalie, Law, Matthew, Wand, Handan, Donovan, Basil, Fairley, Christopher, Skov, Steven, Ah, Chee, Boffa, John, Glance, David, McDermott, Robyn, Maher, Lisa and et al. (2013). STI in remote communities: improved and enhanced primary health care (STRIVE) study protocol: a cluster randomised controlled trial comparing 'usual practice' STI care to enhanced care in remote primary health care services in Australia. BMC Infectious Diseases,13:425-1-425-9.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title STI in remote communities: improved and enhanced primary health care (STRIVE) study protocol: a cluster randomised controlled trial comparing 'usual practice' STI care to enhanced care in remote primary health care services in Australia
Author Ward, James
McGregor, Skye
Guy, Rebecca
Rumbold, Alice R.
Garton, Linda
Silver, Bronwyn J.
Taylor-Thomson, Debbie M.
Hengel, Belinda
Knox, Janet
Dyda, Amalie
Law, Matthew
Wand, Handan
Donovan, Basil
Fairley, Christopher
Skov, Steven
Ah, Chee
Boffa, John
Glance, David
McDermott, Robyn
Maher, Lisa
et al.
Journal Name BMC Infectious Diseases
Publication Date 2013
Volume Number 13
ISSN 1471-2334   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 425-1
End Page 425-9
Total Pages 1
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
HERDC Category C2 - Journal Article - Other contributions to refereed journal (internal)
Abstract Background
Despite two decades of interventions, rates of sexually transmissible infections (STI) in remote Australian Aboriginal communities remain unacceptably high. Routine notifications data from 2011 indicate rates of chlamydia and gonorrhoea among Aboriginal people in remote settings were 8 and 61 times higher respectively than in the non-Indigenous population.

Methods/design
STRIVE is a stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial designed to compare a sexual health quality improvement program (SHQIP) to usual STI clinical care delivered in remote primary health care services. The SHQIP is a multifaceted intervention comprising annual assessments of sexual health service delivery, implementation of a sexual health action plan, six-monthly clinical service activity data reports, regular feedback meetings with a regional coordinator, training and financial incentive payments. The trial clusters comprise either a single community or several communities grouped together based on geographic proximity and cultural ties. The primary outcomes are: prevalence of chlamydia, gonorrhoea and trichomonas in Aboriginal residents aged 16–34 years, and performance in clinical management of STIs based on best practice indicators. STRIVE will be conducted over five years comprising one and a half years of trial initiation and community consultation, three years of trial conditions, and a half year of data analysis. The trial was initiated in 68 remote Aboriginal health services in the Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia.

Discussion
STRIVE is the first cluster randomised trial in STI care in remote Aboriginal health services. The trial will provide evidence to inform future culturally appropriate STI clinical care and control strategies in communities with high STI rates.
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to CC Attribution 3.0 License
Link to published version
URL https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/legalcode
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2334/13/425/abstract


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