Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Using short-term measures of behaviour to estimate long-term fitness of southern elephant seals

New, Leslie F., Clark, James S., Costa, Daniel P., Fleishman, E., Hindell, Mark A., Klanjscek, T., Lusseau, D., Kraus, S., McMahon, Clive R., Robinson, Patrick W., Schick, Robert S., Schwarz, L. K., Simmons, Samantha E., Thomas, Len, Tyack, P. and Harwood, John (2014). Using short-term measures of behaviour to estimate long-term fitness of southern elephant seals. Marine Ecology Progress Series,496:99-108.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 7
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID 84376995xPUB24
Title Using short-term measures of behaviour to estimate long-term fitness of southern elephant seals
Author New, Leslie F.
Clark, James S.
Costa, Daniel P.
Fleishman, E.
Hindell, Mark A.
Klanjscek, T.
Lusseau, D.
Kraus, S.
McMahon, Clive R.
Robinson, Patrick W.
Schick, Robert S.
Schwarz, L. K.
Simmons, Samantha E.
Thomas, Len
Tyack, P.
Harwood, John
Journal Name Marine Ecology Progress Series
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 496
ISSN 0171-8630   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84893418395
Start Page 99
End Page 108
Total Pages 10
Place of Publication Germany
Publisher Inter-Research
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Environmental changes (a type of disturbance) are altering the habitat of southern elephant seals Mirounga leonina, an apex marine predator in the Southern Ocean. As a result, individuals may shift their behaviour, spending more time in transit and less time foraging. The effects of these sublethal changes in behaviour can accumulate, indirectly impacting lifetime fitness through changes in individual survival and reproduction. If a sufficient proportion of the population is affected, the probability of population persistence will be altered. We used data from long-term telemetry studies of female elephant seals at Macquarie Island, Australia, to model the effect of behaviour on the seals' health (i.e. all internal factors that affect homeostasis). Through simulation, we investigated the effect of increasing periods of behavioural shifts, quantifying how the exclusion of maternal southern elephant seals from foraging habitat may affect their health, offspring survival, individual fitness and population growth rate. A long period of altered behaviour (>50% of an average foraging trip at sea) in 1 yr resulted in a small (0.4%) decline in population size the following year. However, a persistent disruption (e.g. 30 yr), caused for example by the long-term effects of climate change, could result in a 0.3% decline in individual fitness and a 10% decline in population size. Our approach to estimating the long-term population effects of short-term changes in individual behaviour can be generalised to include physiological effects and other causes of behavioural and physiological disruption, such as anthropogenic disturbance, for any species.
Keywords Kalman filter
Mirounga leonina
Population consequences of disturbance
State-space model
Telemetry data
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps10547   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes Copyright by Inter-Research New LF, Clark JS, Costa DP, Fleishman E and others (2014) Using short-term measures of behaviour to estimate long-term fitness of southern elephant seals. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 496:99-108
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 43 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 16:11:53 CST by Anthony Hornby