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An integrated assessment of financial, hydrological, ecological and social impacts of 'development' on Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in northern Australia

Stoeckl, Natalie, Jackson, Sue, Pantus, Francis, Finn, Marcus, Kennard, Mark J. and Pusey, Bradley J. (2013). An integrated assessment of financial, hydrological, ecological and social impacts of 'development' on Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in northern Australia. Biological Conservation,159:214-221.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title An integrated assessment of financial, hydrological, ecological and social impacts of 'development' on Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in northern Australia
Author Stoeckl, Natalie
Jackson, Sue
Pantus, Francis
Finn, Marcus
Kennard, Mark J.
Pusey, Bradley J.
Journal Name Biological Conservation
Publication Date 2013
Volume Number 159
ISSN 0006-3207   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84872721715
Start Page 214
End Page 221
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Field of Research 300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences
Abstract We use data and insights from several inter-related but independent projects conducted over 6. years (2006-11) in the Daly River catchment in Australia's Northern Territory to explore the potential impacts of 'development' on Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents. We do this by combining economic, hydrological, and ecological data and models into an integrated model. We then use the model to assess the effect of six different types of economic 'development' on water resources, the habitat of aquatic resources and the incomes of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. We combine this information with estimates of the value of aquatic resources consumed by local Indigenous people to generate estimates of the potential net impact of those development scenarios. We also discuss other social and cultural impacts likely to be associated with the degradation of aquatic resources.Our analysis shows that Indigenous people not only have more to lose from 'development' which erodes natural capital than do non-Indigenous people, but they also have significantly less to gain. Under current institutional arrangements it thus seems that, at best, 'development' may have a relatively benign impact on their well-being. At worst, it may have a detrimental effect brought about by degradation of local aquatic ecosystems.There are negative spill-over effects from development for non-Indigenous people too. Evidently some conservation land uses - which tend to align more closely with current Indigenous cultural prerogatives - may be better able to effectively promote the well-being of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people than more conventional types of 'development'.
Keywords Agricultural development
Aquatic ecosystems
Australia
Economic impact
Indigenous
Integrated modelling
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2012.12.007   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 16:36:57 CST by Anthony Hornby