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A study of soil formation rates using 10Be in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia

Lal, R., Fifield, L.K., Tims, S.G., Wasson, Robert J. and Howe, David (2012). A study of soil formation rates using 10Be in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. In: Evers, M., Kluth, P., Tims, S.G., Wallner, A. and Williams, E. 1st Heavy Ion Accelerator Symposium on Fundamental and Applied Science, HIAS 2012, Canberra, ACT, 11-13 April 2012.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Lal, R.
Fifield, L.K.
Tims, S.G.
Wasson, Robert J.
Howe, David
Title A study of soil formation rates using 10Be in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia
Conference Name 1st Heavy Ion Accelerator Symposium on Fundamental and Applied Science, HIAS 2012
Conference Location Canberra, ACT
Conference Dates 11-13 April 2012
Conference Publication Title Heavy Ion Accelerator Symposium on Fundamental and Applied Science 2012
Editor Evers, M.
Kluth, P.
Tims, S.G.
Wallner, A.
Williams, E.
Publisher EPJ Web of Conferences
Publication Year 2012
Volume Number 35
ISSN 2101-6275   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1
End Page 5
Total Pages 5
Abstract A catchment level study to obtain soil formation rates using beryllium-10 (10Be) tracers has been undertaken in the Daly River Basin in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. Three soil cores have been collected to bedrock, with depths ranging from ∼1-3.5 m. Due to agricultural practices, modern soil loss rates can be significantly higher than long-term soil formation rates, but establishing soil formation rates has proved to be a difficult problem. At long-term equilibrium, however, soil formation from the underlying rock is balanced by soil loss from the surface. This long-term rate at which soil is being lost can be determined using the cosmogenic tracer 10Be, created in spallation of atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen by cosmic rays. Since the annual fallout rate of 10Be is known, the complete 10Be inventory over the depth of the top soil can be used to establish the soil formation rates.
Description for Link Link to published version
URL https://doi.org/10.1051/epjconf/20123501001
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 16:45:14 CST by Anthony Hornby