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Changes in body fluids of the cocooning fossorial frog Cyclorana australis in a seasonally dry environment

Reynolds, Stephen J., Christian, Keith A., Tracy, Christopher R. and Hutley, Lindsay B. (2011). Changes in body fluids of the cocooning fossorial frog Cyclorana australis in a seasonally dry environment. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Molecular and Integrative Physiology,160(3):348-354.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 82057923xPUB50
Title Changes in body fluids of the cocooning fossorial frog Cyclorana australis in a seasonally dry environment
Author Reynolds, Stephen J.
Christian, Keith A.
Tracy, Christopher R.
Hutley, Lindsay B.
Journal Name Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Publication Date 2011
Volume Number 160
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1095-6433   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-80052091571
Start Page 348
End Page 354
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication United States
Publisher Elsevier Inc.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract We investigated changes in the lymph (equivalent to plasma) and urine of the cocooning frog Cyclorana australis during the dry season in monsoonal northern Australia. Frogs in moist soil for two days were fully hydrated (lymph 220mOsmkg -1, urine 49mOsmkg -1). From five weeks onwards the soil was dry (matric potential <-8000kPa). Aestivating frogs at three and five months formed cocoons in shallow (<20cm) burrows and retained bladder fluid (25-80% of standard mass). After three months, urine but not lymph osmolality was elevated. After five months, lymph (314mOsmkg -1) and urine (294mOsmkg -1) osmolality and urea concentrations were elevated. Urea was a major contributing osmolyte in urine and accumulated in lymph after five months. Lymph sodium concentration did not change with time, whereas potassium increased in urine after five months. Active animals had moderate lymph osmolality (252mOsmkg -1), but urea concentrations remained low. Urine was highly variable in active frogs, suggesting that they tolerate variation in hydration state. Despite prolonged periods in dry soil, osmolality increase in C. australis was not severe. Aestivation in a cocoon facilitates survival in shallow burrows, but such a strategy may only be effective in environments with seasonally reliable rainfall.
Keywords aestivation
body fluid osmolality
burrowing frog
cocoon
hylid
seasonality
soil water potential
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2011.06.028   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 17:09:00 CST by Anthony Hornby