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Attendance, performance and the acquisition of early literacy skills: A comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous school children

Ehrich, John, Wolgemuth, Jennifer R., Helmer, Janet, Oteng, Georges, Lea, Tess, Bartlett, Claire, Smith, Heather and Emmett, Susan (2010). Attendance, performance and the acquisition of early literacy skills: A comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous school children. Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties,15(2):131-149.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 81704288xPUB85
Title Attendance, performance and the acquisition of early literacy skills: A comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous school children
Author Ehrich, John
Wolgemuth, Jennifer R.
Helmer, Janet
Oteng, Georges
Lea, Tess
Bartlett, Claire
Smith, Heather
Emmett, Susan
Journal Name Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties
Publication Date 2010
Volume Number 15
Issue Number 2
ISSN 1940-4158   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-79960882027
Start Page 131
End Page 149
Total Pages 19
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract As part of an evaluation of a web-based early literacy intervention, ABRACADABRA, a small exploratory study was conducted over one term in three primary schools in the Northern Territory. Of particular concern was the relationship between attendance and the acquisition of early literacy skills of Indigenous and non-Indigenous children. Using the GRADE literacy assessment, it was found that students made significant gains in a number of early literacy skills (e.g. phonological awareness skills and vocabulary processing). Classroom attendance was strongly and positively correlated with the acquisition of phonological awareness skills and early literacy skills (e.g. letter recognition, word identification processing). Indigenous children attended class significantly less frequently than non-Indigenous children and performed significantly worse overall, particularly with regard to phonological processing tasks. In light of these findings, it is suggested irregular attendance contributed to the Indigenous students lowered literacy acquisition.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19404150903524580   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 17:27:54 CST by Anthony Hornby