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Orientation for general practice in remote Aboriginal communities: A program for registrars in the Northern Territory

Morgan, Simon (2006). Orientation for general practice in remote Aboriginal communities: A program for registrars in the Northern Territory. Australian Journal of Rural Health,14(5):202-208.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Orientation for general practice in remote Aboriginal communities: A program for registrars in the Northern Territory
Author Morgan, Simon
Journal Name Australian Journal of Rural Health
Publication Date 2006
Volume Number 14
Issue Number 5
ISSN 1038-5282   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-33749458957
Start Page 202
End Page 208
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Abstract Background: Remote general practice can be a highly rewarding career, but poses many personal and professional challenges. It is characterised by significant geographical, professional and social isolation and a requirement for practitioners with public health, emergency and extended clinical skills. The remote practitioner faces further challenges in the remote Aboriginal community setting, including language and cultural barriers.

Objectives: This paper discusses the specific components of aremote Aboriginal community general practice registrar orientation program in the Northern Territory, and their particular importance and relevance to remote training and practice in this context.

Discussion: Northern Territory General Practice Education, the regional general practice training provider in the Northern Territory, has developed a model for a comprehensive orientation program for general practice registrars planning to work in remote Aboriginal community locations. This comprises a number of core components, including communication and cultural safety training; clinical and procedural skill development; population health; self-care and personal/ professional role delineation; and organisational issues. We believe it is a program that is applicable to other disciplines undertaking work in remote Aboriginal communities. © 2006 The Author; Journal Compilation
Keywords Aboriginal health
Remote general practice
Rural health
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1584.2006.00810.x   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 18:39:47 CST by Anthony Hornby