Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Increased diabetes incidence in Greek and Italian migrants to Australia: How much can be explained by known risk factors?

Hodge, Allison M., English, Dallas r., O'Dea, Kerin and Giles, Graham G. (2004). Increased diabetes incidence in Greek and Italian migrants to Australia: How much can be explained by known risk factors?. Diabetes Care,27(10):2330-2334.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus Article | Citations

Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

Title Increased diabetes incidence in Greek and Italian migrants to Australia: How much can be explained by known risk factors?
Author Hodge, Allison M.
English, Dallas r.
O'Dea, Kerin
Giles, Graham G.
Journal Name Diabetes Care
Publication Date 2004
Volume Number 27
Issue Number 10
ISSN 0149-5992   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-4644284929
Start Page 2330
End Page 2334
Total Pages 5
Place of Publication United States of America
Publisher American Diabetes Association
Field of Research MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES
Abstract OBJECTIVE—The aims of the study were to determine whether Greek or Italian migrants to Australia have an elevated incidence of type 2 diabetes compared with Australian-born individuals and to what extent any differences can be explained by known risk factors.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This was a prospective study of 34,097 men and women aged 40–69 years born in Greece, Italy, Australia, or New Zealand who were free from diabetes at baseline. For all self-reported cases of diabetes at the 4-year follow-up, a confirmation of diagnosis was sought from medical practitioners. Of these, anyone for whom there was no evidence against a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes was considered a case subject.

RESULTS
—Follow-up was completed by 29,331 (86%) participants, and 334 case subjects were identified. The cumulative incidence of type 2 diabetes among Greek (2.6%) and Italian (2.4%) migrants was more than three times that in Australian-born (0.7%) individuals. After adjusting for age only, the odds ratios (ORs) for being of Greek and Italian origin compared with Australian origin were 3.8 (95% CI 2.9–5.0) and 3.3 (2.6–4.3), respectively. The only known risk factor for type 2 diabetes that materially affected these ORs was BMI. After adjusting for BMI and age, the ORs for being of Greek and Italian origin, respectively, were 2.4 (1.8–3.2) and 2.0 (1.5–2.6).

CONCLUSIONS
—Greek and Italian migrants to Australia have a more than three times greater incidence of type 2 diabetes than Australian-born individuals, and this is only partly explained by BMI. Although weight control will remain important for these high-risk groups, identification of other risk factors is required.
Keywords FFQ
Food frequencey questionnaire
MCCS
Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study
WHR, waist-to-hip ratio
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/diacare.27.10.2330   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 1 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 19:08:41 CST by Anthony Hornby