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Factors influencing the escape response of an arboreal agamid lizard of tropical Australia (Lophognathus temporalis) in an urban environment

Blamires, Sean J. (1999). Factors influencing the escape response of an arboreal agamid lizard of tropical Australia (Lophognathus temporalis) in an urban environment. Canadian Journal of Zoology,77(12):1998-2003.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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Title Factors influencing the escape response of an arboreal agamid lizard of tropical Australia (Lophognathus temporalis) in an urban environment
Author Blamires, Sean J.
Journal Name Canadian Journal of Zoology
Publication Date 1999
Volume Number 77
Issue Number 12
ISSN 0008-4301   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-0033494321
Start Page 1998
End Page 2003
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication Canada
Publisher N R C Research Press
Field of Research 0608 - Zoology
Abstract The escape response of the agamid lizard Lophognathus temporalis in an urban population was examined during the dry season. Two measurements of escape response were made: the distance an observer can approach before the lizard flees (approach distance) and the distance the lizard flees to refuge (flight distance). The relationship between approach distance and flight distance was examined, as was the relationship between air temperature and both approach distance and flight distance. The influence of time of day, the lizard's perch (in a tree or on the ground), and year (1996 or 1998) on the escape response was determined. Approach distance and flight distance had no relationship with each other. Air temperature had a positive relationship with approach distance, so variations in temperature between the two years might explain variations in approach distance between them. The lizard's perch had the greatest influence on flight distance. Lizards in trees fled shorter distances, usually to the opposite side of the tree trunk or branch to the observer. Lizards on the ground always fled to the nearest refuge.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/z03-079   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 19:54:59 CST by Anthony Hornby