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Optimization theory of stomatal behaviour: II. Stomatal responses of several tree species of north Australia to changes in light, soil and atmospheric water content and temperature

Thomas, D. S., Eamus, Derek and Bell, Darren (1999). Optimization theory of stomatal behaviour: II. Stomatal responses of several tree species of north Australia to changes in light, soil and atmospheric water content and temperature. Journal of Experimental Botany,50(332):393-400.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 23 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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Title Optimization theory of stomatal behaviour: II. Stomatal responses of several tree species of north Australia to changes in light, soil and atmospheric water content and temperature
Author Thomas, D. S.
Eamus, Derek
Bell, Darren
Journal Name Journal of Experimental Botany
Publication Date 1999
Volume Number 50
Issue Number 332
ISSN 0022-0957   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-0032991625
Start Page 393
End Page 400
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Field of Research 270400 Botany
Abstract In a companion paper several methods of calculating the marginal unit water cost of plant carbon gain (∂E/∂A) were tested to determine whether stomata were behaving optimally in relation to regulating leaf gas exchange. In this paper one method is applied to several tropical tree species when leaf-to-air vapour pressure difference (D), photosynthetic photon flux density, leaf temperature, and atmospheric soil water availability were manipulated. The response of leaves that had expanded during the dry season were also compared to that of leaves that had expanded in the wet season. Few differences in absolute value of ∂E/∂A, or the form of the relationship, were observed between species or between seasons. In the majority of species, ∂E/∂A increased significantly as either leaf-to-air vapour pressure difference increased, at a leaf temperature of either 33°C or 38°C, or as photosynthetic photon flux density increased. In contrast, as leaf temperature increased at constant D, ∂E/∂A was generally constant. As pre-dawn water potential declined, ∂E/∂A declined, indicating increased efficiency of stomatal behaviour. The relationship between ∂E/∂A and D did not differ whether internal or ambient carbon dioxide concentration were kept constant. It is concluded that stomata are only behaving optimally over a very small range of D. If a larger range of D is used, to incorporate values that more closely reflect those experienced by tropical trees in a savanna environment, optimization is incomplete.
Keywords Marginal unit water cost
Stomatal optimization theory
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/50.332.393   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 19:58:25 CST by Anthony Hornby