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Different effects of microhabitat fragmentation on patterns of dispersal of an intertidal gastropod in two habitats

Crowe, Tasman P. (1996). Different effects of microhabitat fragmentation on patterns of dispersal of an intertidal gastropod in two habitats. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology,206(1-2):83-107.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 29 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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Title Different effects of microhabitat fragmentation on patterns of dispersal of an intertidal gastropod in two habitats
Author Crowe, Tasman P.
Journal Name Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Publication Date 1996-12-01
Volume Number 206
Issue Number 1-2
ISSN 0022-0981   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-0030302543
Start Page 83
End Page 107
Total Pages 25
Place of Publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Field of Research BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Abstract Small-scale movements of animals with respect to microhabitat can have important consequences for a species and its interactions with resources and other members of the local assemblage. Patterns of movement of animals in relation to habitat are sometimes predicted using their patterns of distribution with respect to it. Gastropods (Bembicium auratum (Quoy and Gaimard)) are found in association with fragmented patches of oysters (Saccostrea commercialis) on sheltered rocky shores and in mangrove forests in central NSW. This paper reports an experimental test of models of movement of Bembicium based on its patterns of distribution with respect to oysters. The experiment was replicated at sites on rocky shores and in mangrove forests. On rocky shores, patterns of dispersal of juvenile Bembicium were as predicted by the models based on patterns of distribution. It was not possible to predict patterns of dispersal of adults using such models. Patterns of dispersal in mangrove forests were very different from those on rocky shores, despite similar patterns of distribution. These results suggest that models predicting patterns of movement of Bembicium auratum must incorporate information about the ages of the animals, the arrangement of microhabitat and the habitat they occupy. It is also clear that models based on patterns of distribution of animals will not always be effective in predicting patterns of movement into and out of patches of habitat and that the extrapolation of models from one habitat to another should be attempted with caution.
Keywords Dispersal
Gastropod
Mangrove
Microhabitat
Movement
Rocky intertidal
Spatial heterogeneity
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-0981(96)02615-9   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 20:14:25 CST by Anthony Hornby