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Microalgae for use in tropical aquaculture II: Effect of salinity on growth, gross chemical composition and fatty acid composition of three species of marine microalgae

Renaud, Susan M. and Parry, David L. (1994). Microalgae for use in tropical aquaculture II: Effect of salinity on growth, gross chemical composition and fatty acid composition of three species of marine microalgae. Journal of Applied Phycology,6(3):347-356.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Microalgae for use in tropical aquaculture II: Effect of salinity on growth, gross chemical composition and fatty acid composition of three species of marine microalgae
Author Renaud, Susan M.
Parry, David L.
Journal Name Journal of Applied Phycology
Publication Date 1994
Volume Number 6
Issue Number 3
ISSN 0921-8971   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-0028045465
Start Page 347
End Page 356
Total Pages 10
Place of Publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Field of Research BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Abstract The influence of salinity on the growth, gross chemical composition and fatty acid composition of three species of marine microalgae,Isochrysis sp.,Nannochloropsis oculata andNitzschia (frustulum), was investigated. There was no significant change in growth rate ofIsochrysis sp. andN. (frustulum) over the experimental range of salinity (10–35 ppt), whileN. oculata had a significantly slower growth rate only at 35 ppt. The ash content of all three species increased with increasing salinity. Two species,Isochrysis sp. andN. oculata, showed significant linear increases in total lipid content with increasing salinity over the range 10 to 35 ppt.N. (frustulum) showed significant linear decrease in total lipids, with the highest percentage at low salinity within the range 10–15 ppt. Variation in salinity had only a slight effect on the total protein, the soluble carbohydrate and chlorophylla content of all species. All species responded to change in salinity by modifying their cellular fatty acid compositions. Significant positive correlations were observed between increase in salinity and increase in the percentage ofcis-9-hexadecenoic acid [16:1 (n-7)] over the entire experimental range inN. (frustulum) and between 25–35 ppt inN. oculata. There were curved relationships between salinity and percentage of hexadecanoic acid [16:0] inN. oculata andN. (frustulum), with maxima within the range 25–30 ppt for both species. A curved relationship was found between salinity and percentage of eicosapentaenoic acid [20–5(n-3)], forN. (frustulum), with lowest percentages of the fatty acid within the range 25–30 ppt. There was no consistent pattern in the percentages of other major fatty acids as functions of salinity. The Northern Territory isolateN. (frustulum) was unusual in having a substantial increase in total fatty acids with decreasing salinity (85 mg g−1 dry wt at 10 ppt compared with 33 mg g−1 at 35 ppt). The optimum salinities for the production of maximum amount of lipids and the essential fatty acids 20:5(n-3) and/or 22:6(n-3) were as follows:

25 ppt forIsochrysis sp. [22:6(n-3)]; 20–30 ppt forN. oculata [20:5(n-3)]; 10–15 ppt forN. (frustulum) [20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3)].
Keywords Microalgae
Salinity
Fatty acid composition
Chemical composition
Tropical aquaculture
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02181949   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2014, 20:23:26 CST by Anthony Hornby