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The failure of the evidence of shared innovations in Cape York Peninsula

Black, Paul (2004). The failure of the evidence of shared innovations in Cape York Peninsula. In Bowern, Claire and Koch, Harold(Ed.), Australian Languages: Classification and the comparative method. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins Pub.. (pp. 241-267).

Document type: Book Chapter
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Author Black, Paul
Title of Chapter The failure of the evidence of shared innovations in Cape York Peninsula
Title of Book Australian Languages: Classification and the comparative method
Place of Publication Amsterdam ; Philadelphia
Publisher John Benjamins Pub.
Publication Year 2004
Series Current issues in linguistic theory no. 249
Editor Bowern, Claire
Koch, Harold
ISBN 9027247617   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Volume Number 249
Chapter Number 11
Start Page 241
End Page 267
Total Pages 27
Total Chapters 1
Language English
Field of Research 380206 Language in Time and Space (incl. Historical Linguistics, Dialectology)
2004 - Linguistics
1303 - Specialist Studies in Education
HERDC Category B - Book Chapter (DEST)
Abstract The present paper attempts to explore the evidence for shared innovations in Cape York Peninsula systematically: is there any such evidence that sheds light on subgrouping, particularly at levels where groupings are not otherwise obvious? After presenting general background, the paper first moves from north to southwest to review evidence on languages that have been grouped as Northern, Middle and Southwest Paman, and then it moves east to cover additional “initial dropping” languages and more conservative languages along the east coast. Much of this evidence is from past comparative work, but occasionally supplemented by new material. This review leads to a conclusion that the occasionally more convincing evidence for shared innovations either relates to such obvious groupings as dialects of the same language or else tends to be swamped by changes that appear to have occurred independently in differently languages and/or tend to provide conflicting evidence for subgrouping.
Keyword Paman languages
comparative reconstruction
language classification
shared innovations
Australian Indigenous languages
Cape York Peninsula
 
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Created: Wed, 10 Dec 2014, 17:37:46 CST by Paul Black