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Knowledge and motivation: two elements of health literacy that remain low with regard to nurse practitioners in Australia

Cashin, Andrew, Heartfield, Marie, Cox, Darlene, Dunn, Sandra V. and Stasa, Helen (2015). Knowledge and motivation: two elements of health literacy that remain low with regard to nurse practitioners in Australia<br />. Australian Health Review,39(4):470-475.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 9
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IRMA ID 84377429xPUB67
Title Knowledge and motivation: two elements of health literacy that remain low with regard to nurse practitioners in Australia
Author Cashin, Andrew
Heartfield, Marie
Cox, Darlene
Dunn, Sandra V.
Stasa, Helen
Journal Name Australian Health Review
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 39
Issue Number 4
ISSN 0156-5788   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
eISSN 1449-8944
Start Page 470
End Page 475
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Language English
Field of Research 1110 - Nursing
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Objective This paper presents analysis of consumer focus groups that were undertaken as a part of the project to develop the now current Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia’s Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice.

Methods Six focus groups were conducted with consumers around Australia, including urban and remote areas. One purpose for these groups was to explore what was known of nurse practitioners and whether consumers could articulate the difference between the regulated titles of enrolled nurse, registered nurse and nurse practitioner.

Results Consumers’ knowledge of nurses’ roles in the Australian primary healthcare system, and hence system literacy (particularly in terms of navigating the system), was low. Of perhaps greatest importance is the fact that those consumers with low health systems literacy also exhibited a low level of motivation to seek new knowledge. Many consumers relied on the medical profession to direct care.

Conclusion
The low levels of health literacy raise questions of how to meaningfully include health consumers in innovative health-related policy work.

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH14126   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Tue, 21 Jul 2015, 13:47:21 CST by Sandra Dunn