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Acacia holosericea (Fabaceae) litter has allelopathic and physical effects on mission grass (Cenchrus pedicellatus and C. polystachios) (Poaceae) seedling establishment

Quddus, Muhammad S., Bellairs, Sean M. and Wurm, Penelope A.S. (2014). Acacia holosericea (Fabaceae) litter has allelopathic and physical effects on mission grass (Cenchrus pedicellatus and C. polystachios) (Poaceae) seedling establishment. Australian Journal of Botany,62(3):189-195.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article

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IRMA ID 84376995xPUB43
Title Acacia holosericea (Fabaceae) litter has allelopathic and physical effects on mission grass (Cenchrus pedicellatus and C. polystachios) (Poaceae) seedling establishment
Author Quddus, Muhammad S.
Bellairs, Sean M.
Wurm, Penelope A.S.
Journal Name Australian Journal of Botany
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 62
Issue Number 3
ISSN 0067-1924   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84904115918
Start Page 189
End Page 195
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Invasion of grass weeds is a major threat for ecosystems. Mission grass (Cenchrus pedicellatus and C. polystachios) vigorously competes with native vegetation and has become a serious problem in northern Australian savanna. A lower density of mission grass has been observed under the canopy of stands of native Acacia holosericea. We used a series of laboratory and shade house experiments to assess the potential for allelopathy and the role of litter on germination, emergence and seedling growth of these two species of mission grass. Different concentrations of aqueous leaf extract of A. holosericea were used to assess allelopathic effects on germination. Various depths and types of litter were used to investigate the allelopathic and physical effects of litter on emergence and growth of mission grass seedlings in the shade house. Results indicate that extracts did not affect germination of either species of mission grass but root growth of seedlings was affected. Emergence of seedlings in the shade house was affected by physical litter treatments but not by allelopathy. After emergence no negative effects on seedling growth were detected. Overall we found that there was no allelopathic effect on germination and that the negative effect on emergence was due to the physical properties of the litter. This effect on emergence increased with increasing depth of litter. Allelopathy slightly inhibited root growth but once seedlings emerged, litter tended to facilitate growth. This has implications for the ecological management of mission grass on disturbed lands, using strategies such as manipulation of litter cover through Acacia establishment.
Keywords Allelopathy
Emergence
Germination
Grass weed
Suppression
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/BT13294   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes Accepted version pp. 1-18.


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