Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Food security of households with access to subsidized rice in west Timor where maize is the traditional staple

Myers, Bronwyn, Wiendiyati, Pickering, Samuel and Tenrisanna, Vidyahwati (2014). Food security of households with access to subsidized rice in west Timor where maize is the traditional staple. Food Security: the science, sociology and economics of food production and access to food,6(3):385-395.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article

Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID 84376995xPUB4
Title Food security of households with access to subsidized rice in west Timor where maize is the traditional staple
Author Myers, Bronwyn
Wiendiyati
Pickering, Samuel
Tenrisanna, Vidyahwati
Journal Name Food Security: the science, sociology and economics of food production and access to food
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 6
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1876-4517   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84901331156
Start Page 385
End Page 395
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract The impacts of the Indonesian government subsidized rice program, RASKIN, were assessed in two rural villages in West Timor, eastern Indonesia, where traditionally the staple food is maize. The RASKIN program aims to make subsidized rice available to poor households, the allocation estimated to be a third of household requirements. All of the households interviewed bought subsidized rice when it was first available in this area in 2005, however about 30 % of households did not buy subsidized rice again, mainly because of a preference for maize over rice. Of the households that continued to buy subsidized rice, about half did not have enough cash to buy subsidized rice frequently, suggesting a targeting error of failure to benefit poor households. Households that bought subsidized rice consumed the rice with instant noodles and fewer nuts and beans (traditionally grown and eaten with maize), leading to a potentially lower nutrition intake. The practices of households selling their own produce, such as maize, beans and chickens, to purchase subsidized rice may constitute perverse outcomes, including future food shortages.
Keywords Subsidized rice
Food security
Eastern Indonesia
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12571-014-0353-5   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 17 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 19 Aug 2015, 12:05:45 CST