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"We like to listen to stories about fish": Integrating Indigenous Ecological and Scientific Knowledge to Inform Environmental Flow Assessments

Jackson, Sue E., Douglas, Michael M., Kennard, Mark J., Pusey, Brad J., Huddleston, Jabal, Harney, Bill, Liddy, Lenny, Liddy, Mona, Liddy, Robert, Sullivan, Lizzy, Huddleston, Brenda, Banderson, Melissa, McMah, Andrew and Allsop, Quentin (2014). "We like to listen to stories about fish": Integrating Indigenous Ecological and Scientific Knowledge to Inform Environmental Flow Assessments. Ecology and Society,19(1 - Article No. 43).

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 84376995xPUB32
Title "We like to listen to stories about fish": Integrating Indigenous Ecological and Scientific Knowledge to Inform Environmental Flow Assessments
Author Jackson, Sue E.
Douglas, Michael M.
Kennard, Mark J.
Pusey, Brad J.
Huddleston, Jabal
Harney, Bill
Liddy, Lenny
Liddy, Mona
Liddy, Robert
Sullivan, Lizzy
Huddleston, Brenda
Banderson, Melissa
McMah, Andrew
Allsop, Quentin
Journal Name Ecology and Society
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 19
Issue Number 1 - Article No. 43
ISSN 1708-3087   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Total Pages 14
Place of Publication Canada
Publisher Resilience Alliance Publications
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Studies that apply indigenous ecological knowledge to contemporary resource management problems are increasing globally; however, few of these studies have contributed to environmental water management. We interviewed three indigenous landowning groups in a tropical Australian catchment subject to increasing water resource development pressure and trialed tools to integrate indigenous and scientific knowledge of the biology and ecology of freshwater fish to assess their water requirements. The differences, similarities, and complementarities between the knowledge of fish held by indigenous people and scientists are discussed in the context of the changing socioeconomic circumstances experienced by indigenous communities of north Australia. In addition to eliciting indigenous knowledge that confirmed field fish survey results, the approach generated knowledge that was new to both science and indigenous participants, respectively. Indigenous knowledge influenced (1) the conceptual models developed by scientists to understand the flow ecology and (2) the structure of risk assessment tools designed to understand the vulnerability of particular fish to low-flow scenarios.
Keywords Daly River
Environmental flow
Fish ecology
Indigenous ecological knowledge
Indigenous fish knowledge
Integration
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-05874-190143   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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