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Remote school gardens: exploring a cost-effective and novel way to engage Australian Indigenous students in nutrition and health

Hume, Andrew, Wetten, Alexander, Feeney, Camilla, Taylor, Sally, O'Dea, Kerin and Brimblecombe, Julie K. (2014). Remote school gardens: exploring a cost-effective and novel way to engage Australian Indigenous students in nutrition and health. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health,38(3):235-240.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 4
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IRMA ID 11436xPUB22
Title Remote school gardens: exploring a cost-effective and novel way to engage Australian Indigenous students in nutrition and health
Author Hume, Andrew
Wetten, Alexander
Feeney, Camilla
Taylor, Sally
O'Dea, Kerin
Brimblecombe, Julie K.
Journal Name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 38
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1326-0200   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84901831355
Start Page 235
End Page 240
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Objective: This pilot study aimed to determine the feasibility of a novel, low-cost program to get remote schools started in gardening and nutrition activities, for a lower cost than existing models, and without on-the-ground horticultural support.
Methods:
A multi-site, mixed methods case study was undertaken, in which four remote schools were shipped gardening materials and a nutrition and cooking resource, and provided with horticultural support by phone and email. A support register and teacher surveys were used for four months of evaluation.
Results: The study demonstrated that the program is feasible, and may be associated with an increase from baseline in student's time spent cooking, gardening and on related classroom activities.
Conclusions: The program was delivered economically without the need for on-the-ground staff, in a manner that was acceptable to teachers.
Implications: This model may have application in remote schools throughout Australia, where there is a need to alter health impacting behaviours in high-risk populations. Lengthier program evaluation times and further resource development may be worth investigating in the future.
Keywords Aboriginal
Nutrition
Education
Horticulture
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12236   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Description for Link Link to publisher's version
URL http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1753-6405.12236/abstract
 
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