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Trichomonas vaginalis as a cause of perinatal morbidity: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Silver, Bronwyn J., Guy, Rebecca J, Kaldor, John M., Jamil, Muhammad S. and Rumbold, Alice R. (2014). Trichomonas vaginalis as a cause of perinatal morbidity: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sexually Transmitted Diseases,41(6):369-376.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 22
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IRMA ID 11436xPUB26
Title Trichomonas vaginalis as a cause of perinatal morbidity: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Author Silver, Bronwyn J.
Guy, Rebecca J
Kaldor, John M.
Jamil, Muhammad S.
Rumbold, Alice R.
Journal Name Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 41
Issue Number 6
ISSN 0148-5717   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84901254298
Start Page 369
End Page 376
Total Pages 8
Place of Publication United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common curable sexually transmissible infection worldwide, with high rates in women of reproductive age. There have been inconsistent findings about the impact of infection and its treatment in pregnancy. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the association between T. vaginalis and perinatal outcomes. Electronic databases were searched to May 2013. Included studies reported perinatal outcomes in women infected and uninfected with T. vaginalis. Meta-analysis calculated a pooled relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using either a fixed- or random-effects model. Study bias was assessed using funnel plots. Of 178 articles identified, 11 studies met the inclusion criteria. The study populations, outcomes, and quality varied. T. vaginalis in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of preterm birth (RR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.15-1.75; 9 studies; n = 81,101; I2 = 62.7%), preterm premature rupture of membranes (RR, 1.41; 95% CI,1.10-1.82; 2 studies; n = 14,843; I2 = 0.0%) and small for gestational age infants (RR, 1.51; 95% CI,1.32-1.73; 2 studies; n = 14,843; I2 = 0.0%). Sensitivity analyses of studies that accounted for coinfection with other sexually transmissible infection found a slightly reduced RR of 1.34 for preterm birth (95% CI, 1.19-1.51; 6 studies; n = 72,077; I2 = 11.2%), and in studies where no treatment was confirmed, the RR was 1.83 (95% CI, 0.98-3.41; 3 studies; n = 1795; I2 = 22.3%). Our review provides strong evidence that T. vaginalis in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth. Based on fewer studies, there were also substantial increases in the risk of preterm premature rupture of membranes and small for gestational age infants. Further studies that address the current gaps in evidence on treatment effects in pregnancy are needed.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000134   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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