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Can mobile phone multimedia messages and text messages improve clinic attendance for Aboriginal children with chronic otitis media? A randomised controlled trial

Phillips, James H., Wigger, Christine, Beissbarth, Jemima, McCallum, Gabrielle B., Leach, Amanda J. and Morris, Peter S. (2014). Can mobile phone multimedia messages and text messages improve clinic attendance for Aboriginal children with chronic otitis media? A randomised controlled trial. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health,50(5):362-367.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 75039815xPUB263
Title Can mobile phone multimedia messages and text messages improve clinic attendance for Aboriginal children with chronic otitis media? A randomised controlled trial
Author Phillips, James H.
Wigger, Christine
Beissbarth, Jemima
McCallum, Gabrielle B.
Leach, Amanda J.
Morris, Peter S.
Journal Name Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 50
Issue Number 5
ISSN 1034-4810   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84899101209
Start Page 362
End Page 367
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Aim
Does phone multimedia messages (MMS) to families of Indigenous children with tympanic membrane perforation (TMP): (i) increase clinic attendance; (ii) improve ear health; and (iii) provide a culturally appropriate method of health promotion?
Methods
Fifty-three Australian Aboriginal children with a TMP living in remote community households with a mobile phone were randomised into intervention (n = 30) and control (n = 23) groups. MMS health messages in local languages were sent to the intervention group over 6 weeks.
Results
Primary outcome: there was no significant difference in clinic attendance, with 1.3 clinic visits per child in both groups (mean difference −0.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) −1.1, 0.9; P = 0.9).
Secondary outcomes: (i) there was no significant change in healed perforation (risk difference 6%; 95% CI −10, 20; P = 0.6), middle ear discharge (risk difference −1%; 95% CI −30, 30; P = 1.0) or perforation size (mean difference 3%; 95% CI −11, 17; P = 0.7) between the groups; (ii) 84% (95% CI 60, 90) in the control and 70% (95% CI 50, 80) in the intervention group were happy to receive MMS health messages in the future. The difference was not significant (risk difference −14%; 95% CI −37, 8; P = 0.3).
Conclusions
Although there was no improvement in clinic attendance or ear health, this randomised controlled trial of MMS in Indigenous languages demonstrated that MMS is a culturally appropriate form of health promotion. Mobile phones may enhance management of chronic disease in remote and disadvantaged populations.
Keywords Aboriginal
MMS
Mobile phone
Otitis media
Text message
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.12496   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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