Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Pathogens penetrating the central nervous system: Infection pathways and the cellular and molecular mechanisms of invasion

Dando, Samantha J., MacKay-Sim, Alan, Norton, Robert, Currie, Bart J., St. John, James A., Ekberg, Jenny A. K., Batzloff, Michael, Ulett, Glen C. and Beacham, Ifor R. (2014). Pathogens penetrating the central nervous system: Infection pathways and the cellular and molecular mechanisms of invasion. Clinical Microbiology Reviews,27(4):691-726.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 3
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID 75039815xPUB539
Title Pathogens penetrating the central nervous system: Infection pathways and the cellular and molecular mechanisms of invasion
Author Dando, Samantha J.
MacKay-Sim, Alan
Norton, Robert
Currie, Bart J.
St. John, James A.
Ekberg, Jenny A. K.
Batzloff, Michael
Ulett, Glen C.
Beacham, Ifor R.
Journal Name Clinical Microbiology Reviews
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 27
Issue Number 4
ISSN 0893-8512   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84907717011
Start Page 691
End Page 726
Total Pages 36
Place of Publication United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract The brain is well protected against microbial invasion by cellular barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). In addition, cells within the central nervous system (CNS) are capable of producing an immune response against invading pathogens. Nonetheless, a range of pathogenic microbes make their way to the CNS, and the resulting infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Bacteria, amoebae, fungi, and viruses are capable of CNS invasion, with the latter using axonal transport as a common route of infection. In this review, we compare the mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens reach the CNS and infect the brain. In particular, we focus on recent data regarding mechanisms of bacterial translocation from the nasal mucosa to the brain, which represents a little explored pathway of bacterial invasion but has been proposed as being particularly important in explaining how infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei can result in melioidosis encephalomyelitis.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CMR.00118-13   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 83 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 19 Aug 2015, 12:17:23 CST