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Personality traits, self-care behaviours and glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II

Skinner, Timothy, Bruce, David, Davis, Timothy and Davis, Wendy A. (2014). Personality traits, self-care behaviours and glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II. Diabetic Medicine,31(4):487-492.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 2
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IRMA ID 83393865xPUB110
Title Personality traits, self-care behaviours and glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II
Author Skinner, Timothy
Bruce, David
Davis, Timothy
Davis, Wendy A.
Journal Name Diabetic Medicine
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 31
Issue Number 4
ISSN 0742-3071   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84896133927
Start Page 487
End Page 492
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Aims
To determine whether the personality traits of conscientiousness and agreeableness are associated with self-care behaviours and glycaemia in Type 2 diabetes.

Methods

The Big Five Inventory personality traits Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Neuroticism and Openness were determined along with a range of other variables in 1313 participants with Type 2 diabetes (mean age 65.8 ± 11.1 years; 52.9% men) undertaking their baseline assessment as part of the community-based longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II. Age- and sex-adjusted generalized linear modelling was used to determine whether personality was associated with BMI, smoking, self-monitoring of blood glucose and medication taking. Multivariable regression was used to investigate which traits were independently associated with these self-care behaviours and HbA1c.

Results
Patients with higher conscientiousness were less likely to be obese or smoke, and more likely to perform self-monitoring of blood glucose and take their medications (P ≤ 0.019), with similar independent associations in multivariate models (P ≤ 0.024). HbA1c was independently associated with younger age, indigenous ethnicity, higher BMI, longer diabetes duration, diabetes treatment, self-monitoring of blood glucose (negatively) and less medication taking (P ≤ 0.009), but no personality trait added to the model.

Conclusions
Although there was no independent association between personality traits and HbA1c, the relationship between high conscientiousness and low BMI and beneficial self-care behaviours suggests an indirect positive effect on glycaemia. Conscientiousness could be augmented by the use of impulse control training as part of diabetes management.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.12339   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Wed, 19 Aug 2015, 12:20:37 CST