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Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership

Moyle, Kathryn (2014). Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership. Education Sciences,4(1):36-51.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 84279116xPUB128
Title Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership
Author Moyle, Kathryn
Journal Name Education Sciences
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 4
Issue Number 1
ISSN 2227-7102   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 36
End Page 51
Total Pages 16
Place of Publication Switzerland
Publisher M D P I AG
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians and the Australian Curriculum; and the implementation of professional standards as outlined in the Australian Professional Standard for Principals and the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. These policies create expectations of school leaders to bring about change in classrooms and across their schools, often described as bringing about ‘quality teaching’ and ‘school improvement’. These policies indicate that Australian children should develop ‘democratic values’, and that school principals should exercise ‘democratic values’ in their schools. The national approaches to the implementation of these policies however, is largely silent on promoting learning that fosters democracy through education, or about making connections between teaching and learning with technologies, school leadership and living in a democracy. Yet the policies promote these connections and alignments. Furthermore, understanding democratic values, knowing what is a democracy, and being able to use technologies in democratic ways, has to be learned and practiced. Through the lens of the use of technologies to build digital citizenship and to achieve democratic processes and outcomes in schools, these policy complexities are examined in order to consider some of the implications for school leadership.
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Keywords Democracy
Technologies
School leadership
Digital citizenship
Professional standards
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/educsci4010036   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to CC Attribution 3.0 License
URL https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au


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