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Mobilities and the path dependence: challenges for tourism and "attractive" industry development in a remote company town

Carson, Doris A. and Carson, Dean B. (2014). Mobilities and the path dependence: challenges for tourism and "attractive" industry development in a remote company town. Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism,14(4):460-479.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 84279116xPUB260
Title Mobilities and the path dependence: challenges for tourism and "attractive" industry development in a remote company town
Author Carson, Doris A.
Carson, Dean B.
Journal Name Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 14
Issue Number 4
ISSN 1502-2250   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84920026805
Start Page 460
End Page 479
Total Pages 20
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract This paper discusses the impacts of resource-based path dependence on alternative development scenarios in remote company towns, with a particular focus on understanding the prospects for new path creation in tourism and other “attractive” industries, such as retirement and lifestyle migration. The paper applies a mobilities perspective to the idea of path dependence in remote resource frontiers to analyse how the flows of people, skills and capital can become locked in by a range of factors, such as investments in infrastructure and transport technologies, established network connections for labour and knowledge provision, traditional economic development policies, and entrenched mobility cultures. The research examines the case of Nhulunbuy, a remote mining town in northern Australia, which currently faces severe socio-economic decline due to the closure of its alumina refinery. Using a range of secondary data sources, including population statistics and public documents, the case study traces Nhulunbuy's development path since the 1970s and identifies a number of exogenous and endogenous causes for the potential lock-in of its mobilities trajectory. The implications for alternative pathways in tourism and other “attractive” industries are discussed, focusing on identifying the institutional and infrastructural changes required to unlock mobility flows.
Keywords mobilities
path dependence
company towns
tourism
attractive industries
remote
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15022250.2014.967997   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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