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Landscape management of fire and grazing regimes alters the fine-scale habitat utilisation by feral cats

McGregor, Hugh, Legge, Sarah, Jones, Menna and Johnson, Christopher (2014). Landscape management of fire and grazing regimes alters the fine-scale habitat utilisation by feral cats. PLoS One,9(10 - Article No. e109097).

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 84376995xPUB200
Title Landscape management of fire and grazing regimes alters the fine-scale habitat utilisation by feral cats
Author McGregor, Hugh
Legge, Sarah
Jones, Menna
Johnson, Christopher
Journal Name PLoS One
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 9
Issue Number 10 - Article No. e109097
ISSN 1932-6203   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Total Pages 9
Place of Publication United States of America
Publisher Public Library of Science
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Intensification of fires and grazing by large herbivores has caused population declines in small vertebrates in many ecosystems worldwide. Impacts are rarely direct, and usually appear driven via indirect pathways, such as changes to predator-prey dynamics. Fire events and grazing may improve habitat and/or hunting success for the predators of small mammals, however, such impacts have not been documented. To test for such an interaction, we investigated fine-scale habitat selection by feral cats in relation to fire, grazing and small-mammal abundance. Our study was conducted in north-western Australia, where small mammal populations are sensitive to changes in fire and grazing management. We deployed GPS collars on 32 cats in landscapes with contrasting fire and grazing treatments. Fine-scale habitat selection was determined using discrete choice modelling of cat movements. We found that cats selected areas with open grass cover, including heavily-grazed areas. They strongly selected for areas recently burnt by intense fires, but only in habitats that typically support high abundance of small mammals. Intense fires and grazing by introduced herbivores created conditions that are favoured by cats, probably because their hunting success is improved. This mechanism could explain why, in northern Australia, impacts of feral cats on small mammals might have increased. Our results suggest the impact of feral cats could be reduced in most ecosystems by maximising grass cover, minimising the incidence of intense fires, and reducing grazing by large herbivores.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0109097   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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