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Ecological risks and opportunities from engineered artificial flooding as a means of achieving environmental flow objectives

Bond, Nick, Costelloe, Justin, King, Alison, Warfe, Danielle, Reich, Paul and Balcombe, Stephen (2014). Ecological risks and opportunities from engineered artificial flooding as a means of achieving environmental flow objectives. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment,12(7):386-394.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 12
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IRMA ID 84376995xPUB9
Title Ecological risks and opportunities from engineered artificial flooding as a means of achieving environmental flow objectives
Author Bond, Nick
Costelloe, Justin
King, Alison
Warfe, Danielle
Reich, Paul
Balcombe, Stephen
Journal Name Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 12
Issue Number 7
ISSN 1540-9295   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84907009817
Start Page 386
End Page 394
Total Pages 9
Place of Publication United States of America
Publisher Ecological Society of America
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Restoration of floodplain ecosystems through the reinstatement of floods is often hampered by insufficient water as a result of competing human demands. An emerging alternative approach relies on floodplain infrastructure – such as levees, weirs, regulators, and pumps – to control water levels within floodplains without requiring landscape-scale overbank floods. This technique, albeit water efficient and capable of achieving some ecological targets, does not mimic the hydraulics, hydrodynamics, and lateral connectivity of natural floods. Engineering approaches like this may risk detrimental ecological outcomes, including reductions in biotic connectivity, river–floodplain productivity, and water quality, and thus may fail to support the range of ecological processes required to sustain healthy river–floodplain systems. Here, we review the potential benefits, risks, and mitigation options associated with engineered artificial flooding. Given the growing challenge of equitable water allocation, further research on and monitoring of engineered floods as a tool to sustain floodplain ecosystems are urgently required.



DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/130259   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes Copyright by the Ecological Society of America


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