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Evaluating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion activities using audit and feedback

O'Donoghue, Lynette, Percival, Nikki, Laycock, Alison, McCalman, Janya, Tsey, Komla, Armit, Christine and Bailie, Ross (2014). Evaluating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion activities using audit and feedback. Australian Journal of Primary Health,20:339-344.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 5
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IRMA ID 84473306xPUB8
Title Evaluating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion activities using audit and feedback
Author O'Donoghue, Lynette
Percival, Nikki
Laycock, Alison
McCalman, Janya
Tsey, Komla
Armit, Christine
Bailie, Ross
Journal Name Australian Journal of Primary Health
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 20
ISSN 1448-7527   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 339
End Page 344
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Indigenous primary health care (PHC) services have been identified as exemplary models of comprehensive PHC; however, many practitioners in these services struggle to deliver effective health promotion. In particular, practitioners have limited capacity and resources to evaluate health promotion activities. Best practice health promotion is important to help address the lifestyle and wider factors that impact on the health of people and communities. In this paper, we report on the acceptability and feasibility of an innovative approach for evaluating the design of health promotion activities in four Indigenous PHC services in the Northern Territory. The approach draws on a popular continuous quality improvement technique known as audit and feedback (A&F), in which information related to best practice is gathered through the use of a standardised audit tool and fed back to practitioners. The A&F approach has been used successfully to improve clinical service delivery in Indigenous PHC; however, the technique has had limited use in health promotion. The present study found that facilitated participatory processes were important for the collection of locally relevant information and for contributing to improving PHC practitioners’ knowledge and understanding of best practice health promotion.
Keywords Evaluation
Indigenous population
Quality improvement
Primary health care
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY14048   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Description for Link Link to publisher's version
URL http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=PY14048
 
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