Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Oral health behaviours and perceptions reported by Indigenous Australians living in Darwin, Northern Territory

Amarasena, N., Kapellas, K., Skilton, M., Maple-Brown, Louise J., Brown, Alex, Bartold, P. M., O'Dea, Kerin, Celermajer, David S., Slade, G. and Jamieson, L. S. (2014). Oral health behaviours and perceptions reported by Indigenous Australians living in Darwin, Northern Territory. Community Dental Health,31(1):57-61.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts:
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID cmartelxPUB139
Title Oral health behaviours and perceptions reported by Indigenous Australians living in Darwin, Northern Territory
Author Amarasena, N.
Kapellas, K.
Skilton, M.
Maple-Brown, Louise J.
Brown, Alex
Bartold, P. M.
O'Dea, Kerin
Celermajer, David S.
Slade, G.
Jamieson, L. S.
Journal Name Community Dental Health
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 31
Issue Number 1
ISSN 0265-539X   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84897673798
Start Page 57
End Page 61
Total Pages 5
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher F D I World Dental Press Ltd.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract OBJECTIVE:
To describe the reported oral health behaviours and perceptions of Indigenous Australians living in Darwin, Northern Territory and to compare those with estimates for Darwin and Australia derived from the National Survey of Adult Oral Health (NSAOH).

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 181 Indigenous Australians aged 22 years and over living in Darwin, participating in screening for a wider randomised clinical trial, were included.

METHOD:

Information on socio-demographic characteristics, oral health status including oral health behaviours and perceptions was collected using a questionnaire. Differences between the Darwin study (DS) participants and Australians in NSAOH were made based on non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS:

Almost 72% of DS participants had last seen a dentist over a year earlier, compared to 47% and 39% of NSAOH Darwin and Australian participants, respectively. A higher proportion of DS participants usually visited a dentist because of a problem than NSAOH Darwin and NSAOH Australian participants. A higher proportion of DS participants had avoided or delayed a dental visit because of cost than NSAOH participants. Over three times as many DS participants rated their oral health as fair/poor compared to NSAOH participants. A higher proportion of DS participants had perceived gum disease and one or more symptoms of gum disease than NSAOH participants. A higher proportion of DS participants experienced toothache, felt uncomfortable about appearance of their mouth and avoided eating because of oral problems than NSAOH participants.

CONCLUSIONS:

A higher proportion of Indigenous Australians living in Darwin presented with non-optimal oral health behaviours and perceptions compared with both the Darwin and Australian general populations.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1922/CDH_3276Jamieson05   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 16 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 19 Aug 2015, 12:34:25 CST