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Messages that increase women's intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy: results from quantitative testing of advertising concepts

France, Kathryn E., Donovan, Robert J., Bower, Carol, Elliott, Elizabeth J., Payne, Janet M., D'Antoine, Heather and Bartu, Anne E. (2014). Messages that increase women's intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy: results from quantitative testing of advertising concepts. BMC Public Health,14(Article No. 30).

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID cmartelxPUB177
NHMRC Grant No. 480109
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Title Messages that increase women's intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy: results from quantitative testing of advertising concepts
Author France, Kathryn E.
Donovan, Robert J.
Bower, Carol
Elliott, Elizabeth J.
Payne, Janet M.
D'Antoine, Heather
Bartu, Anne E.
Journal Name BMC Public Health
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 14
Issue Number Article No. 30
ISSN 1471-2458   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84892376974
Total Pages 13
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Background
Public awareness-raising campaigns targeting alcohol use during pregnancy are an important part of preventing prenatal alcohol exposure and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Despite this, there is little evidence on what specific elements contribute to campaign message effectiveness. This research evaluated three different advertising concepts addressing alcohol and pregnancy: a threat appeal, a positive appeal promoting a self-efficacy message, and a concept that combined the two appeals. The primary aim was to determine the effectiveness of these concepts in increasing women’s intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy.

Methods

Women of childbearing age and pregnant women residing in Perth, Western Australia participated in a computer-based questionnaire where they viewed either a control or one of the three experimental concepts. Following exposure, participants’ intentions to abstain from and reduce alcohol intake during pregnancy were measured. Other measures assessed included perceived main message, message diagnostics, and potential to promote defensive responses or unintended consequences.

Results

The concepts containing a threat appeal were significantly more effective at increasing women’s intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy than the self-efficacy message and the control. The concept that combined threat and self-efficacy is recommended for development as part of a mass-media campaign as it has good persuasive potential, provides a balance of positive and negative emotional responses, and is unlikely to result in defensive or unintended consequences.

Conclusions

This study provides important insights into the components that enhance the persuasiveness and effectiveness of messages aimed at preventing prenatal alcohol exposure. The recommended concept has good potential for use in a future campaign aimed at promoting women’s intentions to abstain from alcohol during pregnancy.
Keywords Alcohol
Advertising
Pregnancy
Messages
Campaigns
Threat
Self-efficacy
Fear
FASD
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-30   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 2.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to CC Attribution 3.0 License
URL https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/auD


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