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Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia?

Erskine, Wayne, Saynor, Mike, Turner, K, Whiteside, Timothy, Boyden, James and Evans, Ken (2014). Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia?. In: International Symposium on Sediment Dynamics: From the Summit to the Sea, New Orleans, USA, 11-14 December 2014.

Document type: Conference Paper
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IRMA ID 84377429xPUB37
Author Erskine, Wayne
Saynor, Mike
Turner, K
Whiteside, Timothy
Boyden, James
Evans, Ken
Title Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia?
Conference Name International Symposium on Sediment Dynamics: From the Summit to the Sea
Conference Location New Orleans, USA
Conference Dates 11-14 December 2014
Conference Publication Title Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences
Publisher IAHS Press
Publication Year 2014
Volume Number 367
Start Page 283
End Page 290
Total Pages 8
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DIISR)
Abstract Soil erosion rates on plots of waste rock at Ranger uranium mine and basin sediment yields have been measured for over 30 years in Magela Creek in northern Australia. Soil erosion rates on chlorite schist waste rock are higher than for mica schist and weathering is also much faster. Sediment yields are low but are further reduced by sediment trapping effects of flood plains, floodouts, billabongs and extensive wetlands. Suspended sediment yields exceed bedload yields in this deeply weathered,
tropical landscape, but the amount of sand transported greatly exceeds that of silt and clay. Nevertheless, sand is totally
stored above the topographic base level. Longitudinal continuity of sediment transport is not maintained. As a result, suspended sediment and bedload do not move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek and lower Magela Creek wetlands trap about 90.5% of the total sediment load input.
Keyword Turbidity
Sediment yields
Sediment discontinuities
Natural sediment traps
Sediment budget
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URL http://iahs.info/
http://www.proc-iahs.net/367/index.html
 
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Created: Wed, 19 Aug 2015, 16:39:06 CST