Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Fluid flow effects on objects with a dimpled surface

Brown, Sean (2015). Fluid flow effects on objects with a dimpled surface. Bachelor of Engineering (4th Year Project) Thesis, Charles Darwin University.

Document type: Thesis
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your CDU eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Download this reading Thesis_CDU_50294_Brown_S.pdf PDF version generated by student application/pdf 2.08MB 731
Reading the attached file works best in Firefox, Chrome and IE 9 or later.

Author Brown, Sean
Title Fluid flow effects on objects with a dimpled surface
Institution Charles Darwin University
Publication Date 2015
Thesis Type Bachelor of Engineering (4th Year Project)
Subjects 0913 - Mechanical Engineering
Abstract This thesis investigates the fluid flow effects of geometries with a dimpled surface as compared to smooth surfaces. Geometries studied include cylinders, pointed orgives and streamlined bodies. The surfaces of the geometries studied have an array of evenly spaced dimples with specific dimensional properties to achieve a reduction in total drag forces exerted by fluid flow. Computational Fluid Dynamic flow simulations were conducted to observe boundary layer initiation and development along each object profile and drag forces experienced at speeds ranging from 5m/s to 40m/s. Along with the computed analysis, wind tunnel testing was conducted to observe real time boundary layer formation and drag forces resulting from wind speeds of the same range over geometry models. For visualisation in wind tunnel testing a smoke wand was utilised to demonstrate fluid flow over each model. Drag data was collected from surface integration calculations produced in CFD testing and from force gauges in wind tunnel testing. All results were compared with the performance of smooth surfaced models of the same geometry to observe the effects of the dimpled surface application.

Predominantly the investigation of this thesis is to experimentally determine whether or not the drag forces are either increased or diminished due to the dimpled surface texture.


© copyright

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in CDU eSpace. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact digitisation@cdu.edu.au.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 135 Abstract Views, 731 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 23 Oct 2015, 16:25:57 CST by Jessie Ng