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Implications of invasive alien species for rainforest tourism: a case study on feral pigs in Australia's Wet Tropics World Heritage Area

Koichi, Kana, Cottrell, Alison, Sangha, Kamaljit K. and Gordon, Iain J. (2014). Implications of invasive alien species for rainforest tourism: a case study on feral pigs in Australia's Wet Tropics World Heritage Area<br />. In Prideaux, Bruce(Ed.), Rainforest Tourism, Conservation and Management: challenges for sustainable development. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. (pp. 259-274).

Document type: Book Chapter
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Author Koichi, Kana
Cottrell, Alison
Sangha, Kamaljit K.
Gordon, Iain J.
Title of Chapter Implications of invasive alien species for rainforest tourism: a case study on feral pigs in Australia's Wet Tropics World Heritage Area
Title of Book Rainforest Tourism, Conservation and Management: challenges for sustainable development
Place of Publication New York, NY, USA
Publisher Routledge
Publication Year 2014
Editor Prideaux, Bruce
ISBN 978-0-415-63582-0   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 259
End Page 274
Total Pages 16
Total Chapters 1
Field of Research 300800 Environmental Sciences
Abstract [Extract] Rainforests are a significant focus of the world's biodiversity conservation because of their species richness (DeFries et al., 2005). Conservation strategies for rainforests rely on protected areas, such as national parks and World Heritage Areas, to protect remaining habitats and species. Protected areas are also recognised as important tourist attractions (Ceballos-Lascurain, 1996). Ecotourism is the primary mode of tourism in protected areas, and relies on an undisturbed environment as an important part of the ecotourism experience (Mowforth and Munt, 2003; Chan and Baum, 2007). Revenues gained from the ecotourism industry play an important role for biodiversity conservation (Gossling, 1999). This means that both ecotourism and biodiversity conservation can be mutually beneficial: ecotourism depends on the quality of the protected area environment as a prime attraction for tourists, and in turn, ecotourism serves as a powerful incentive for conservation, and as a revenue generator for protected areas.
 
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Created: Mon, 26 Oct 2015, 11:02:56 CST by Marion Farram