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Postural neck pain: An investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia

Edmondston, SJ, Chan, HY, Ngai, GCW, Warren, MLR, Williams, JM, Glennon, S and Netto, K (2007). Postural neck pain: An investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia. Manual Therapy,12(4):363-371.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Postural neck pain: An investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia
Author Edmondston, SJ
Chan, HY
Ngai, GCW
Warren, MLR
Williams, JM
Glennon, S
Netto, K
Journal Name Manual Therapy
Publication Date 2007
Volume Number 12
Issue Number 4
ISSN 1356-689X   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-34548285274
Start Page 363
End Page 371
Total Pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Impairments of cervico-cephalic kinaesthesia, and habitual forward head posture have been considered important in the aetiology of postural neck pain, yet these factors have not been specifically examined in a homogeneous clinical population. The objective of this study was to compare the habitual sitting posture (HSP), perception of good posture and postural repositioning error (PRE) of the cervico-thoracic (CT) spine in individuals with postural neck pain, with a matched group of asymptomatic subjects. Twenty-one subjects with postural neck pain and 22 asymptomatic control subjects were recruited into the study. An optical motion analysis system was used to measure the HSP and perceived 'good' sitting posture. PRE was measured over six trials where the subject attempted to replicate their self-selected 'good' posture. There was no difference between the groups in the HSP but significant differences were identified in the perception of 'good' posture. Posture repositioning error was higher for the head posture variables than for CT and shoulder girdle variables in both groups. However, there was no significant difference in posture repositioning error between groups for any of the posture measures. The findings suggest that individuals with postural neck pain may have a different perception of 'good' posture, but no significant difference in HSP or kinaesthetic sensibility compared with matched asymptomatic subjects. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords posture
pain
kinaesthesia
cervico-thoracic
CERVICOCEPHALIC KINESTHETIC SENSIBILITY
ASYMPTOMATIC OFFICE WORKERS
TRAPEZIUS MUSCLE-ACTIVITY
PSYCHOSOCIAL RISK-FACTORS
MONOTONOUS KEYBOARD WORK
WHIPLASH INJURY
MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS
CERVICAL-SPINE
SHOULDER
HEAD
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.math.2006.07.007   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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