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Insights into nutritionists' practices and experiences in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

Colles, Susan L., Belton, Suzanne and Brimblecombe, Julie K. (2014). Insights into nutritionists' practices and experiences in remote Australian Aboriginal communities<br />. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health,.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Insights into nutritionists' practices and experiences in remote Australian Aboriginal communities
Author Colles, Susan L.
Belton, Suzanne
Brimblecombe, Julie K.
Journal Name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Publication Date 2014
ISSN 1326-0200   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
eISSN 1753-6405
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Abstract
Objective:
To explore and describe methods of communication, education practices, perceived challenges and the potential role of nutritionists working in remote Australian Aboriginal communities in order to inform future public health efforts
Methods: Nutritionists who work or have worked in remote Aboriginal communities in Australia's Northern Territory within the past decade were identified via purposive and snowball sampling, and responded to a semi-structured survey in 2012. Content and interpretive thematic analysis was used to generate themes.
Results: Working approaches of 33 nutritionists are presented, representing 110 years of working experience in the Northern Territory. Emerging themes included: ‘Community consultation is challenging’, ‘Partnering with local people is vital’, ‘Information is not behaviour’, ‘Localisation of nutrition education is important’ and ‘Evaluation is tricky’. Available time, training background and workforce structure were said to constrain practice and those nutritionists with longer experience described a more culturally competent practice.
Conclusions: Modifications in structure, training and support of the public health nutrition workforce, facilitation of professional and cultural partnerships, outcome evaluation and localisation and evaluation of health messages may promote more meaningful nutrition communication in remote communities.
Implications: Findings can inform further investigation into the structures needed to improve public health skills for nutritionists transitioning from mainstream practice into the challenging cross-cultural context of Aboriginal health settings.

Keywords Nutrition
Health communication
Health promotion
Aboriginal
Social determinants
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12351   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Mon, 25 Jan 2016, 11:58:00 CST by Marion Farram