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Alluvial Gully Erosion: A Dominant Erosion Process Across Tropical Northern Australia

Shellberg, Jeff and Brooks, Andrew (2012). Alluvial Gully Erosion: A Dominant Erosion Process Across Tropical Northern Australia<br />. Darwin, NT: Charles Darwin University.

Document type: Research Report
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Author Shellberg, Jeff
Brooks, Andrew
Title of Report Alluvial Gully Erosion: A Dominant Erosion Process Across Tropical Northern Australia
Publication Date 2012
ISBN 978‐1‐921576‐79‐9   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Publisher Charles Darwin University
Place of Publication Darwin, NT
Total Pages 18
Field of Research 300800 Environmental Sciences
Abstract Introduction

Gully erosion is the process by which running water cuts new unstable channels into erodible soil and weathered rock. It causes severe land degradation, and is a major source of sediment and associated nutrients to river systems and ultimately to coastal waters or inland basins. In northern Australia there is widespread gully erosion into unconfined alluvial deposits on active floodplains and terraces (relict floodplains) – here defined as alluvial gully erosion4. Alluvial gully erosion scarps are locally known as “breakaways” by pastoralists (Figure 1). Until this recent TRaCK research, alluvial gully erosion in northern Australia was poorly documented scientifically and is substantially different from colluvial or hillslope gullying in south‐eastern or northern Australia.
 
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Created: Wed, 02 Mar 2016, 11:40:32 CST by Marion Farram